English Curriculum Intent


Fluency in English Language is an essential foundation for success in all subjects. English is both a subject in its own right and the medium for teaching; for pupils, understanding the language provides access to the whole curriculum. KS3 – To instil core skills of reading and writing, spoken language and vocabulary development in a creative, relevant and inspiring way; complimenting previous knowledge and understanding of KS2 and mirroring attributes needed to succeed at KS4. 

To this extent we want our students to learn without limits. We aim to give them the opportunities, experiences, knowledge and analytical tools to speak, write and read confidently, appropriately, and on their own terms in whatever context they find themselves in. We want them to see language and literature both inside the classroom and beyond as the opening to achieving their goals, to help build their intellectual curiosity and personal well-being in every aspect of their lives, both now and the future. 

We strive to give pupils the same experiences when they enter our faculty, regardless of prior attainment levels – the same choices in what they read, the same opportunities for response, the same freedoms and constraints, the same access to high quality texts.  This will ensure all pupils expand further their knowledge and understanding of reading and writing, spoken language and vocabulary development to the highest possible quality; equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word. 

As a faculty we believe that Extra-curricular opportunities in English are paramount.  We offer students the chance to visit the theatre, we have live performances in school for Year 11.  We are starting up a creative writing club after school for all years and an English study café for KS4 to drop in and revise.

Curriculum Aims


  • The curriculum is a progressive one that develops thematically over the key stages to ensure subject knowledge is embedded and improved upon. 
  • The curriculum is designed around key text forms and types of writing. In any given year, pupils are exposed to novels, short stories, plays, poetry, non-fiction and media texts.
  • The curriculum will lessen the gap in students cultural poverty as it will provide a way for students to appreciate the depth, context and power within the literary heritage texts.
  • Will help to develop an appreciation and love of reading and understand increasingly challenging texts 
  • Will enable students to read critically across all texts allowing them to make informed personal responses whilst evaluating other peoples’ responses
  • Write accurately, fluently, effectively and at length for pleasure and information 
  • Plan, draft, edit and proof-read their writing  
  • Consolidate and build on their knowledge of grammar and vocabulary from KS2 and KS3 
  • Speak confidently, audibly and effectively 
  • Will enable students to critically evaluate Media texts and products across various media platforms

Curriculum Overview


Topics covered in each term in each year

  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Yr7 What is a story? Different genres in Literature A Christmas Carol The development of the the Monster Character Origins of Literature focussing on the Archetypal characters Introduction to Shakespeare Romeo and Juliet Romeo and Juliet
Yr8 Blood Brothers The Danger of a Single Story Of Mice and Men The Tempest The Tempest Detective Stories Detective Stories
Yr9 Gothic Literature Rhetoric through the ages Rhetoric through the ages The Effects of War The effects of war Speaking and Listening unit on Identity Component 1 Fiction language paper Macbeth
Yr10 Macbeth First teach Macbeth Power and Conflict poetry Poetry An Inspector Calls Creative writing Component 2 Non fiction paper component 2 Component 3 speaking and listening Introduction to Jekyll and Hyde
Yr11 Component 2 First teach Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Analysis unit. Component 3 revisit Poetry anthology Literature revision Language revision Literature revision Language revision  

 

5 year learning journey 


Assessment

The English Faculty recognises the importance of quality assessment, record keeping and reporting for the following reasons:

  • To inform students about their progress – and how they can develop their knowledge, skills and understanding still further
  • For future planning of the classroom teacher and the subject as a whole
  • To inform parents and guardians of the progress and achievements of their children

Key Tests and Exams
Key Stage 3

  • Two tests are completed each year
  • Formal exams in Years 8 and 9
  • Interim tests in some units

Key Stage 4

  • End of unit tests
  • Past Paper Question tests (every fortnight in Year 11)
  • Year 10 Exam
  • Year 11 Mock Exam
  • Final GCSE Exams

Recording of Test Results

  • Test and exam results (% KS3 and grade KS4 & 5) are centrally recorded by each member of the Faculty staff for Years 9-11 on Integris.
  • Individual teachers are required to keep test records for students in Years 7-8 in their mark books.

Standardisation and Moderation of Tests and Exams

  • Examples of each test and exam are kept at a range of different levels of performance.
  • These have been moderated across the subject area and are used as a reference tool by teachers when marking papers.
  • Time is allocated in subject team meetings for moderation across the teaching team following each key set of tests and exams.
  • All tests and exams are marked using a common mark scheme and graded according to a set of grade boundaries.
  • From September 2019, the Year 7-9 internal tests and exams will be based on

School Values


How do the school values underpin your curriculum?
Ambition Featured in:

  • Year 9 Rhetoric unit
  • Macbeth as out of control ambition

Responsibility Featured in:

  • The Danger of the Single Story
  • Speaking and listening unit on Identity.
  • To an extent in The Tempest focussing on Prospero and his responsibility
  • An Inspector Calls
  • Of Mice and Men
  • Romeo and Juliet
  • A Christmas Carol

Kindness Featured in:

  • The Great War
  • A Christmas Carol
  • Of Mice and Men

Respect Featured in:

  • An Inspector Calls
  • Tempest
  • The Great War
  • A Christmas Carol

Independence Featured in:

  • The identity unit
  • The Danger of a Single story
  • The Tempest
  • Romeo and Juliet as a warning
  • An Inspector Calls

Resilience Featured in:

  • The Detective unit
  • The Tempest
  • An Inspector Calls
  • A Christmas Carol

SMSC & FBV


Spiritual
Explore beliefs and experience; respect faiths, feelings and values; enjoy learning about oneself, others and the surrounding world; use imagination and creativity; reflect.
Featured in:

  • The Danger of a Single Story
  • The Identity unit 
  • The Tempest 
  • The Great War
  • The Monster Unit
  • What is a story
  • Of Mice and Men
  • Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde 
  • A Christmas Carol

Moral

Recognise right and wrong; respect the law; understand consequences; investigate moral and ethical issues; offer reasoned views.

The thematic idea of morals also runs through our first of three Shakespearean plays Romeo and Juliet as students examine who is responsible for the conflict, were Romeo and Juliet right to ignore their families. The idea of fate is introduced to link with the contemporary play Blood Brothers studied in Year 8.

The Blood Brother unit links and compares with Romeo and Juliet and the themes of fate and morality whist also focussing on duality and marginality of characters a theme picked up in KS4. Morality can also be found in Of Mice and Men Students study the characters and the themes surrounding the death of Lennie and 1930s America. The scheme also focuses on diversity of characters, within the 1930s setting. The voices in society unit deepens the students’ knowledge of self in today’s society.  Taking inspiration from Kate Clanchy’s book How to Grow your own poem, The EMC’s book of diverse shorts and What is Race Who are racists. The theme of morality and diversity of characters are studied in The Tempest Where students are asked to reflect as Prospero as he leaves the island. The detective unit focuses on character assessment and writers methods whilst studying a variety of extracts and short stories.

Year 9 deepens the student’s knowledge of the Gothic and links with A Christmas Carol and to some extent The Tempest. The students study texts written by unreliable narrators, which links, to Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.  The nonfiction Rhetoric Unit explores how Logos, Pathos and Ethos are used to influence and position audiences. The unit focuses on speakers from all eras including modern day champions like Marcus Rashford. The Great War features texts and poems from World War 1 thematically links morality and the reality of horrors of war. The end of year 9 links to the KS4 programme as the students work through a component 1 paper and study Macbeth through the study of characters and themes

Social
Use a range of social skills; participate in the local community; appreciate diverse viewpoints; participate, volunteer and cooperate; resolve conflict; engage with the ‘British values‘ of democracy, the rule of law, liberty, respect and tolerance.
Featured in:

  • The identity unit 
  • The Danger of a Single Story
  • Blood Brothers
  • An Inspector calls
  • The Great War
  • The Detective Unit
  • The Tempest
  • The Monster Unit

Cultural
Appreciate cultural influences; appreciate the role of Britain’s parliamentary system; participate in culture opportunities; understand, accept, respect and celebrate diversity.
Featured in:

  • The identity unit 
  • The Danger of a Single Story
  • Blood Brothers
  • An Inspector calls
  • The Great War
  • The Detective Unit
  • The Tempest
  • The Monster Unit

Cultural Capital


What opportunities does your curriculum/faculty provide to improve the cultural capital of our students? 

Theatre trips for all.  We believe there is nothing like seeing a live performance of a show before COVID we succeeded in visiting the Theatre every month.  On our trip to the playhouse to see An Inspector Calls we took a student and his assistant dog.
Since COVID we have taken part in live stream recordings from the RSC and The Globe to ensure the students still experience the buzz of being in a theatre. 

We also welcome live performers into the school which enables the whole of Year 11 to see one of their key texts performed.
September sees the launch of our new creative writing club that is open to all.  We will also be launching an English Study Café for drop in revision sessions.